Thursday, April 28, 2011

Bribe

Because I just have to make this type of jokes now:

A professor was giving a big test one day to his students. He handed out all of the tests and went back to his desk to wait.

Once the test was over the students all handed the tests back in. The professor noticed that one of the students had attached a $100 bill to his test with a note saying "A dollar per point."

The next class the professor handed the graded tests back out.

This student got back his test, his test grade, and $64 change.

Monday, April 25, 2011

Wednesday, April 20, 2011

Origins

A 2nd grader asked her mother the age-old question, "How did I get here?"

Her mother told her, "God sent you."

"Did God send you, too?" asked the child.

"Yes, Dear," the mother replied.

"What about Grandma and Grandpa?" the child persisted.

"He sent them also" the mother said.

"Did he send their parents, too?" asked the child.

"Yes, Dear, He did," said the mother patiently.

"So you're telling me that there has been NO sex in this family for 200 years? No wonder everyone's so damn grumpy around here."

Dog takes blanket

The Peacock Spider

Australia is home to many strange and unusual animals, something the majority of us know. When asked, most people would say that it is the marsupials of the country that are the most significantly different to the rest of the world. Perhaps that assumption should be questioned – Australia is also home to the tiny Peacock Spider, whose behaviour and appearance is nothing short of startling.


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Farmer paints sheep orange

John Heard decided desperate measures were needed to stop the raids that were decimating his flocks.

And his solution to the problem has created an eye-catching sensation on his farm after he turned his sheep orange.

The 48-year-old has put his flock of 250 blackface ewes through a harmless dip of orange dye making them so highly visible wary thieves are giving them a wide berth.

Mr Heard, who runs his livestock farm near Okehampton, Devon had lost 200 sheep over the past few years but says the orange dye is working wonders.

He explained:"Sheep rustling has become a big problem with ewes worth around £140 each. My flock roams Dartmoor and I was getting mighty fed-up with losing so many.

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Tuesday, April 19, 2011

Sometimes you need bacon. Really?

Flowers make a nice gift to the friend that needs a smile or for that special someone in your life. Roses are even better. But sometimes even roses don't cut it. Sometimes you need something a little more non-cliché, something...extraordinary... Sometimes, you need BACON.


My new camera

Well, I have a new camera. It is mine since January 2011, but I have not had much time to try it out yet. All I know is that the pictures look sharp and bright. In my humble opinion this tulip looks rather charming.

Sunday, April 17, 2011

The Douche



For a few weeks, the BBC film crew had the opportunity to follow a unique specimen, they were able to observe and record its mannerisms, rituals and way of life. The result of this is BBC Human Planet: The Douche.


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Monday, April 11, 2011

Choose your silver as you choose your husband

Arctic 'Unicorns' - Nature's Great Events: The Great Melt - BBC One

StripeStrings

Ever thought that the zebra's black-and-white striped markings resemble a biological barcode? Well now a team of US computer scientists and biologists have come up with a scanner, allowing them to identify individual animals from a single still photo.

The system, dubbed StripeSpotter, only requires a small amount of human input. Users draw a rectangle around the zebra's side, then this part of the image is automatically sliced into a number of horizontal bands and each pixel is made fully black or fully white, creating a low-resolution version of the zebra's stripes.



Each band is then encoded as a StripeString, a sequence of coloured blocks with particular lengths - for example, white for two blocks, black for three, white for one - and the collection of StripeStrings forms a StripeCode, the zebra equivalent of a barcode.

When a zebra has been entered into the database and given a StripeCode, the researchers match another picture of the same animal by comparing the StripeStrings of the new and original images. Each image will generate a different set of StripeStrings, but the underlying ratios of black and white should remain similar.

By finding the StripeCode with the most similar StripeStrings in the database, the system is able to accurately identify the correct animal. Other existing zebra identification systems are less accurate, more complex, and require a greater level of manual input from the user.

The zebra scanner is not the first algorithm developed to identify animals in the field - there are also systems for tagging turtles, penguins and rhinos. This new system could also be applied to tigers and giraffes, or any animal with large markings in a small number of distinctive colours. The researchers will present their work at the International Conference on Multimedia Retrieval in Trento, Italy later this month.

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Food ball

Sunday, April 3, 2011

Static Motion Illusion






Biblical Temple

A retired farmer has spent more than 30 years building an enormous scale model of a Biblical temple.

Alec Garrard, 78, has dedicated a massive 33,000 hours to constructing the ancient Herod's Temple, which measures a whopping 20ft by 12ft. The pensioner has hand-baked and painted every clay brick and tile and even sculpted 4,000 tiny human figures to populate the courtyards.




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Saturday, April 2, 2011

Kitty Dance

Spiders in Pakistan encase whole trees in webs

Eerie phenomenon may be a blessing in disguise, as the hungry spiders have significantly reduced the mosquito population.



Even the elders in Pakistan's Sindh province admit they've never seen anything like it: whole trees encased in webs by millions of invading spiders. The mysterious phenomenon may be an unexpected result of the devastating floods that swept over Sindh in 2010, reports Wired.

According to scientists, the spiders likely collected in the trees after fleeing from the rising floodwaters. At their height, the floods covered as much as a fifth of the country and displaced as many as 20 million people.

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